Causes and Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis

Most individuals have probably seen a kind of foot discomfort at some point in their lives. Sports, fitness, and everyday activities will all place us at risk for anything from minor foot aches and pains to serious injury.

Plantar fasciitis is a form of foot injury that may affect almost anyone at any age.

 

What Exactly Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is an infection of the broadband of tissue that links the heel to the toes. Intense, stabbing pain at the bottom of the foot is commonly characterized. The discomfort is more severe after taking the first measures in the morning and normally subsides during the day.

However, plantar fasciitis discomfort can be worse during, not during, workouts.

Running is the most frequent form of plantar fasciitis. According to mayoclinic.org, the plantar fascia acts like a shock-absorbing bowstring in the foot, protecting the arch. Too much friction or pressure on the foot may break the plantar fascia, causing it to become inflamed and painful.

Although running is the most common cause of plantar fasciitis, the following are several other risk factors for tearing the plantar fascia:

  • Age is a factor. Plantar fasciitis is most frequent in people aged 40 to 60.
  • Exercising on the heels.
  • The anatomy of the foot. The form of a foot will place strain on or relieve strain on the plantar fascia.
  • Obesity is an issue.
  • Occupations that necessitate a lot of standing/walking

 

Plantar Fasciitis Treatment

Plantar fasciitis is a very simple condition that can be treated at home. A doctor may diagnose it, but most would encourage you to adopt the RICE treatment:

  • Take a break. Take it easy and rest your foot whenever possible.
  • The ice. Applying ice to an injury may help relieve swelling and inflammation.
  • Compression is the compression of everything. Compression, in addition to minimizing swelling, can provide more protection to the foot.
  • Raise the bar. Elevating the foot forces it to rest and prevents swelling.

Over-the-counter pain relievers are also advised to help alleviate swelling and manage pain. As long as a care schedule is followed, most people with plantar fasciitis improve within a few months. Plantar fasciitis can just worsen and hinder everyday tasks if it is not handled.

 

Plantar Fasciitis Prevention

Daily tasks such as commuting and running are inevitable. So, how do we go about our everyday lives while lowering our risk of common foot injuries?

Wearing comfortable shoes is a safe place to begin. Wearing ill-fitting shoes for the sake of appearance, according to easternidahofootclinic.com, entails more sacrifice than you can know. They went on to state, “Sure, you’ll have foot pain the day after, but you can still hurt your arch due to weak support.”

Stretching while walking, or also while doing everyday activities like work, is another effective way to avoid foot injury. Stretching your foot muscles increases the amount of energy that your tendons and muscle tissue will consume, preparing your body for physical exercise.

The last piece of advice for avoiding a foot injury such as plantar fasciitis is to listen to your body. Stand and take a rest if you start to experience pressure at the bottom of your foot. Knowing your body and quitting until it’s too late will spare you months of agony.