What Exercises Will Help You Lose Belly Fat?

Let’s start with the most common myth regarding reducing belly fat.

 

The Big Misunderstanding

Most people ask me the same concern over and over again. The query is, “What workouts can I do to get rid of this lower belly fat,” or “love handles,” as it is colloquially known.

Even after explaining to her a thousand times, I always get this inquiry from my mother (she doesn’t relate to them as love handles).

It’s a common myth that such movements, such as abdominal crunches, will help you lose belly fat. This is also known as “targeting belly fat” or “place elimination.” Only the money-grubbing health and wellness gurus willing to market you a 6-pack-abs regimen for thousands of dollars are to blame for this thinking pattern.

Don’t go for the hysteria!

 

The Harsh Truth

I’m sorry to break it to you, but targeting specific areas of fat on the body, let alone belly fat, is not feasible.

You may do all the ab crunches, leg raises, and sit-ups you like, but they can just strengthen the heart and not burn fat.

When it comes to losing weight, the body makes its own decisions, and I hate to break it to you, but the lower back and lower belly region is normally the last location it can go.

 

What Are Your Options?

Unfortunately, there is no easy cure for getting the six-pack abs you’ve long desired.

There is no miracle medicine to take, no specific exercise to do, and no simple solution. It kills me to say this because I, too, wish this were the case.

So, what do you do?

You may need to maintain a calorie deficit.

This ensures that you would eat more calories than you eat per day. I’ll break it down and make it as easy as practicable for you.

 

Three Days A Week, You Can Exercise.

Let’s make an illustration of a fictitious girl called Sarah.

Sarah is struggling with her weight; she needs to lose weight but is unable to change her eating patterns. Sarah eats the same number of calories week after week. She works in an office and is sedentary. Everything Sarah eats, she is not burned off, but her body has adapted to the calorie consumption, and her weight is still stable and she is keeping her current weight.

Sarah just has to eat the same as she does plus a workout three days a week to start losing weight.

It may be 30/40 minutes in weight lifting or 30/40 minutes on an aerobic system such as a treadmill, elliptical trainer, stationary cycle, etc.

If you do not have access to a gym, you should still work out at home. Here are a few exercises for you to do. Make a 5-exercise circuit. 30 seconds on and 30 seconds off Rep the circuit 5 times more.

  • Burpees was the first exercise.
  • Jumping jacks was the second exercise.
  • Mountain climbers (Exercise 3)
  • Sit-ups/Crunches (Exercise 4)
  • Knee taps are the fifth exercise.

If you are uncertain about any of the exercises above, type them into Google or YouTube and you can almost certainly find a tutorial for each.

So, what makes you think this would work? Isn’t it true that I can eat ‘well’ and ‘clean’?

Yes, if you don’t eat a varied diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables at least 3/4 of the time, I recommend you start.

However, by working out three days a week, Sarah could theoretically burn 1000/1500 calories more than normal. This is about 2.5 kilograms of fat. As a consequence, this would result in a weekly weight loss of about 2.5 kg, give or take.

If she was going to do something, she wanted to feel at ease and secure when exercising. She didn’t have some fitness clothes, so she said she wanted some Gym Apparel. She bought some gym joggers and tops.

Through doing so, she not only became more at ease when working out, but she still felt obligated and held herself responsible to work out. Let’s face it, we could all use a reason to purchase cute workout clothing.

Sarah was already working out three days a week and losing around 2.5 kilograms a year.

Unfortunately for Sarah and everyone else, the body is adaptable, and after 4/6 weeks, Sarah notices her weight is no longer falling. Metabolism is a strange phenomenon, and it can quickly respond to your calorie intake. What do I do now?

 

Reduce Calorie Consumption.

Sarah could now raise her calorie deficit once more. She also works out three days a week, but her next step is to reduce her calorie consumption. Don’t panic if you don’t know how to calculate calories or if you don’t have an app to monitor your consumption. Simple modifications may have a significant impact.

Every day at college, Sarah consumes a can of Coke and a chocolate bar (amongst other meals). Sarah agrees to limit herself to coke and a chocolate bar any single day. This is a significant difference. A single can of Coke can produce up to 140 calories. On average, a chocolate bar produces 200-250 calories. By eliminating all of these three days a week, you will create an additional calorie loss of about 1000/1250 calories. Sarah will begin gaining weight again, and she has not taken any extreme action.

Isn’t it easy to forego a can of Coke or a chocolate bar?

 

Making A Habit

Sarah now feels ten times happier, thanks to a sustained and continuous effort. She catches the exercise itch and plans to include an additional workout every week. She now feels guilty for getting a can of coke and a chocolate bar so she doesn’t want to undo any of her hard work in the gym.

Her existence has now been fully transformed by a transformation in perspective and a few minor changes.

Small improvements may have a huge impact. If you, like Sarah, believe you ought to lose weight or eat healthily, there is no better time than the moment. Make the transition, like Sarah, to pursue a healthy lifestyle, both physically and emotionally.

You can do it, too, if Sarah can!