Friends Are Preventing You from Making Better Financial Decisions

You should surely purchase the handbag; it was made for you…

Come on out with us tonight!

Please compensate for the dinner this time; I intend to pay the next time…

Does this sound familiar? Normally, we should not see our mates from a financial standpoint, but the fact is that your friends have a significant impact on your financial choices. Friends have an undeniable effect on how you treat your pocket, whether it’s eating out, affecting your buying choices, financial outlook, or something else.

Any mates can also be financially ruinous to you without you even noticing it.

We’ll look at six various types of friends and how their attitudes can affect your life in the following sections. Maybe you’ll see any of your mates here?

 

Activator

Enablers tend to be the most friendly and welcoming of the group. However, they seem to inspire you to make impulsive choices, which, sadly, normally result in overspending.

Enablers can persuade you to buy items you don’t need or that are much too costly for your budget. They are not acting maliciously; rather, they are unaware that their influence could seriously affect your budget.

They are hedonistic individuals who do not consider the implications. They’re entertaining and carefree, but if your pocket isn’t made of rubber, this kind of action normally results in disastrous consequences.

When going out with an enabler, just bring a small sum of cash with you – just the amount you are prepared to invest without jeopardizing your schedule. In this method, you will end up purchasing needless items because you don’t want to say no to your mate, but your overall spending would remain unaffected.

 

scrounger

We’ve also seen slackers. These are the people who, even though they might, would never invest any capital. You should bet that once you head out to eat, she’ll tell you that you have to compensate that you consumed more. She never gives money away and is still looking for opportunities to pay as least as possible.

And if everybody can be financially savvy, there are limitations to it. Cheapskates tend to dampen the atmosphere, and you can give up decent deals because you don’t want to hear another lecture from the cheapskate.

However, not everything is as it appears. Cheapskates can behave in this manner due to a lack of protection. Maybe their family was experiencing financial difficulties? Perhaps they are scared of going bankrupt? Don’t expect your cheapskate buddy to adjust instantly. Instead, try to find a happy medium that will enable you both to have a good time.

 

Exaggeration

The slogan of braggers is “always be more than most.” They are ambitious and always try to remind people about their wealth, how expensive their car or interior décor is, and how many branded clothes they possess.

Braggers are bad for your wallet because they instill insecurity in you, which leads to overspending as you want to deal with them. You can also wind up in massive debt as a result of spending well above your means to remain “in the competition.”

The best way to cope with a bragger is to simply ignore all brags. Let them realize that you are proud of their financial accomplishments, however, they make you feel terrible, so you would like not to dwell on them.

 

website

Ok, it’s impolite to equate your friends to parasites, but the truth is that certain people do survive off of other people’s money. Site-friends can lend you money (but then “forget” about it the next day), lend you stuff (but never return them), and otherwise act as though you are their bank.

When your parasite-friend comes to you for a loan, pose the following questions:

  • Is the component absolutely important right now?
  • Could he get the thing on his own?
  • Will he be able to sign a loan agreement if he had to lend any money?

Site-friends must realize that you are not just a limitless resource. Friendship is not a one-sided relationship.

 

Sniffer

Nosers are much too prevalent. They want to know how much money you have, what your exact salary is, and how much your shoe cost, all in one chat.

Nosers can make you sound as though you’re being interrogated. They sometimes may not even inquire about the emotions. Worse, anything you claim might be held against you later.

When speaking with nosers, make it plain straight away that the financial status is unimportant to the relationship. Ok, it’s fine to discuss money with your peers, but it shouldn’t seem like you’re answering the cops.

 

The accuser who remains silent

“Oh, but you’re wealthy enough to afford a lease?” “Oh, you get your sneakers from that pricey store?” “How wonderful it must be to have money.”

Silent accusers do not directly suggest something negative, but if they remark about all of your decisions, it seems as though a vat of hot oil was thrown on you. The sound of their voice and the look of their eyes are enough to make you feel awful.

For a buddy like that, you’ll quickly see if you ignore those topics or, for example, put your latest watch at home while visiting her because you don’t want to hear another snarky comment.

Bear in mind that you are not the issue as your mate accuses you silently. Maybe she is a little envious, or maybe she doesn’t realize her words make you feel worse. Only forget such remarks.

When a peer makes you feel insecure about your finances, just keep loyal to yourself and don’t let their comments or habits affect you. Try to keep your money and your mates apart. However, if you are uncomfortable, be frank with your friends and let them know – only then would you be able to form a satisfying and caring relationship.